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Posts Tagged ‘Happiness’

Leslie Bennetts writes in MSNBC (Chores for two: Why men don’t pitch in) explaining how she gets her husband to pitch in for household chores.

Yes, dear readers, it’s true: Maintaining some semblance of parity in your marriage requires you to deploy the same kinds of nasty tactics you swore you would never stoop to as a parent but nonetheless found yourself using the minute you actually had a kid. Bribery and punishment work; so do yelling and complaining. Threats are also effective, as long as everyone knows you mean business. With husbands, tender blandishments and nooky are particularly useful, as is the withholding of the aforementioned.

Dr. Helen takes the time to explain nicely why those actions are actually teaching her children all the wrong lessons:

No, ma’am, you are teaching your children that mommy is a nagging bitch and that you hold men in such contempt that you view them as children to do your bidding. You are teaching them that psychological warfare is the only way to get what you want. You overlook your husband’s strong points and what he brings to your family and see yourself, as you mention, as a heroine. Your narcissism is deafening and while you may think you are “striking a blow” for all womankind here, you are doing nothing more than teaching your children that manipulation and threats are the way to engage in a “loving” relationship.

Rachel Lucas whips out the clue-bat and administers a vicious beating, sarcasm style:

Another thing I’ll be sure never to do, from now on as I fully manifest my inner bitch-martyr, is to ever stop for one fucking MINUTE to think about how I am singlehandedly causing every young man who reads my articles to run screaming in terror the minute a girl utters the word “marriage” to him. I will not worry that my words do nothing but a disservice to other women, confirming ugly stereotypes and mens’ worst fears about taking on a wife. It’s not MY problem if men are too weak and immature to sign up for a life closely resembling a forced death march.

Moron Pundit clearly and effectively shows how Leslie Bennetts is wrong by simply placing the shoe on the other foot:

Yes, dear readers, it’s true: Maintaining some semblance of sexual activity in your marriage requires you to deploy the same kinds of nasty tactics you swore you would never stoop to as a parent but nonetheless found yourself using the minute you actually had a kid. Bribery and beating work; so do yelling and bullying. Threats are also effective, as long as everyone knows you mean business (a convenient ‘fall down the stairs’ always works). With wives, throwing things, pushing her around and body blows are particularly useful, as is telling her you only do it because you love her after the aforementioned.

Ace joins in on the action:

But as to the real, bigger point: As was said of Tom in Miller’s Crossing, “I’ve never met anyone who made being a son-of-a-bitch such a point of pride.”Feminism seems to be teaching women that narcissism, unpleasantness, selfishness, and hectoring, nagging, domineering, insufferable behavior are somehow virtues to be praised.

We would like to thank Leslie Bennetts for airing dirty personal laundry in public, so the rest of us can learn a valuable lesson about what not to do.

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Do Single Women Seek Attached Men?

It is an age old question: which gender is most likely to steal a mate from an existing relationship, and are they themselves likely to be in a relationship at the time? Typically men have been blamed, but recent research shows that assumption to be false.

Single women are the most likely to poach a mate according to the report published in Journal of Experimental Social Psychology [PDF].

Noting that single women often complain that “all the good men are taken,” the psychologists wondered if “this perception is really based on the fact that taken men are perceived as good.” To investigate, the researchers quizzed male and female undergraduates — some involved in romantic relationships, some unattached — about their ideal romantic partner.

Although the women in the study denied that the status (attached or single) of the men they were looking at played any part in their decisions, the data showed otherwise. The researchers have decided to look into the data more carefully to make sure they are properly understanding the motivation of the women.

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Frank Bruni has an excellent article in The New York Times Magazine discussing his issues with food, weight and appearance which apparently began in early childhood. It is a riveting tale and we advise you to read it all. Here are a few excerpts.

A hamburger dinner sounded the first alarm. My mother had cooked and served me one big burger, which would be enough for most carnivores still in diapers. I polished it off and pleaded for a second. So she cooked and served me another big burger, confident that I’d never get through it. It was the last time she underestimated my appetite.

It became a pattern. No fourth cookie? I threw up. No midafternoon meal between lunch and dinner? Same deal. I had a bizarre facility for it, and Mom had a sponge or paper towels at hand whenever she was about to disappoint me.

You need to be conscious of time. There’s no such thing as bulimia on the fly; a span of at least 10 minutes in the bathroom is optimal, because you may need 5 of them to linger at the sink, splash cold water on your face and let the redness in it die down. You should always carry a toothbrush and toothpaste, integral to eliminating telltale signs of your transgression and to rejoining polite society without any offense to it. Bulimia is a logistical and tactical challenge as much as anything else. It demands planning.

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According to the study’s lead author, Wendy Troxel, PhD, Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, women who were stably married had the highest quality sleep measured objectively and subjectively, and these results persisted even after controlling for other known risk factors for sleep, including age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and depressive symptoms.

Well, ladies, what are you waiting for?

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